Gateron Magnetic Switches Comparison: KS-20, KS-37B, Jade and Dual Rail

Gateron is manufacturer of keyboard switches and recently they have produced a lot of magnetic switches that are used in Hall Effect mechanical keyboards. I couldn’t not find any comparison of their magnetic switches, so I made one myself.

They all also sound a little bit different. KS-20T model seems to be the newest model released so far with KS-20U coming in March 2024.

GATERON KS-20GATERON KS-37BGATERON KS-20T (Magnetic Jade)GATERON KS-20U (Dual rail)
Switch typeLinearLinearLinearLinear
Forceorange 38gf, white 30gf30gf30±7gf30±7gf
Bottom-out Force50gf50gf50gf50gf
Total travel4.1±0.2mm4.0±0.2mm3.5±0.2mm4.1±0.2mm
Initial magnetic flux102±15Gs120±15Gs120±15Gs102±15Gs
Bottom magnetic flux905±80Gs800±80Gs800±80Gs905±80Gs
Pre-lubedYesYesYesYes
Lifetime keystrokes100 million150 million100 million150 million
Price$25 for 35N/A$68 for 70$69.99 for 70
Keyboards that use themVXE ATK68Meletrix BOOG75, Higround Performance 65,
Endgame Gear KB65HE
Melgeek Cyber01, IROK ND75Keychron Q1 HE, Durgod K100
  • Initial magnetic flux in a keyboard magnetic switch refers to the strength of the magnetic field produced by the magnet(s) within the switch when the switch is in its initial state or at rest. This magnetic field is what allows the switch to detect the presence of a keycap, which in turn triggers the switch to register a keypress.
  • Bottom magnetic flux refers to the strength of the magnetic field produced by the magnet within the switch when the switch is fully actuated or when the keycap is fully pressed down.
  • The magnetic flux values are provided in Gauss (Gs).
  • Force – this is the amount of force required to actuate the switch, meaning to press it down to the point where it registers a keypress. It is typically measured in grams-force (gf). A higher force value means that more pressure is needed to actuate the switch.
  • Bottom-out Force -this is the amount of force required to fully depress the switch, meaning to press it down until it reaches the bottom of its travel.
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How long does 100 million keystrokes last?

Let’s assume an average typing speed of 60 words per minute (WPM), which is equivalent to approximately 300 characters per minute (CPM) if each word is considered to be 5 characters long.

It would take approximately 231.48 days to perform 100 million keystrokes at an average typing speed of 60 WPM. Typing non-stop 24 hours a day. So it’s quite a lot.

Marcus Richardson
Editor-in-chief

I love testing and writing about new tech. I'm also a gamer and an engineer. Check out my Twitter for keyboard stuff.

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